coastal cypress, florida lumber, lumber, cypress, bronson, lumber productscoastal cypress, florida lumber, lumber, cypress
HomeAboutProductsPhoto GalleryQuestionsContact usLinks
 
Why should I select and use cypress wood?
Where do cypress trees come from?
Do cypress trees still grow in the United States?
What are the different types of cypress wood here in the United States?
Is cypress a softwood or a hardwood?
Is cypress wood material an easy product to work with?
Is cypress wood a durable product?
How dry is your cypress material?
What lengths of cypress material does Coastal Cypress offer?
What does rough sawn and smooth planed mean?
Is cypress material a good interior flooring material?
How should I finish my cypress wood products?
How does cypress wood compare with pine and cedar wood?
What is the difference between board feet, square feet, and linear feet?
   

Q: Why should I select and use cypress wood?
To begin with it is a beautiful, fine textured, strait grained, light colored wood that is very durable.  Red cypress is chemically inert and does not impart color, taste, or odor to products coming in contact with it.  In fact, food manufacturers, breweries, wineries, and other companies wishing to avoid taste or smell contamination use cypress for things like tanks, vats, and tubs to preserve the delicate flavor and value of their products.  Because of its durability and legendary hardiness, cypress wood is a great product outside the home, including siding, trim, decks, fences, shutters, window boxes, and landscape design elements.  When milled by a reputable manufacturer, the cypress material typically displays a predominantly yellow tone, with reddish, chocolate, or olive hues.  Noted for its color consistency, density, and few knots, cypress wood is superbly workable, easily machined and installed, and readily finished.  Cypress has been choice of many architects, including Frank Lloyd Wright, and builders for its distinctive look and durability since the early development of our country.

Back to top>

 

 

Q: Where do cypress trees come from?
In the United States, most cypress trees are natives of the southeastern states.  Cypress trees are found primarily in wet, swampy areas along the Atlantic coastal plain from Delaware to Florida, and west along the Gulf of Mexico to the border of Texas and Mexico.  Cypress trees also thrive along the Mississippi Valley from the Louisiana delta to southern Indiana.  While cypress has always been an architectural choice in the Southeastern United States, many builders and trade professionals throughout the United States are using cypress in what had been traditionally cedar, redwood, and treated pine choices.

Back to top>

 

 

Q: Do cypress trees still grow in the United States?
Absolutely!  Even though cypress trees are considered a commodity, there is a large quantity of cypress trees from which to harvest.  The annual cypress production is about 100 – 120 million board feet (6,000 – 7,000 truckloads).  Some of the leading cypress product manufacturers, like BK Cypress Log Homes, participate in reforestation of cypress trees, and it is generally believed that cypress trees are growing at a faster rate than current harvesting.

Back to top> 

 

 

Q: What are the different types of cypress wood here in the United States?
Even though southern or “bald” cypress is the most common name used to describe the specie as a whole, there are actually three types of cypress tree that grow in the United States. 

The first type of cypress tree is Red Cypress ( or coastal), which grows in the deep swamps of the coastal plains of the southeastern United States and along the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to tidewater and is the true species, Taxodium distichum.

The other two types of cypress trees are an inland tree (called yellow and white cypress tree), which has gradually changed its characteristics and is probably more truly a Taxodium adscendens.  This inland cypress is lighter in color, contains more sapwood, has a courser texture, and is not as durable as the Red Cypress. 

Back to top>

 


  
Q: Is cypress a softwood or a hardwood?
Although cypress is softwood, it has traditionally been grouped and manufactured with hardwoods because it grows alongside hardwoods.  Cypress is graded by the rules of the National Hardwood Lumber Association and also the Southern Cypress Manufacturers Association.  Although it has needlelike leaves typical of softwoods, cypress trees lose needles during the fall (like hardwoods), hence the "bald cypress" name is commonly used.

Back to top>

 

 

Q: Is cypress wood material an easy product to work with?
You bet it is!  Cypress works well with both hand and power tools.  The wood planes easily and resists warping because of its tight grain.  Also, the cypressene resin, a natural preservative developed during the growth of the cypress tree, is not sticky like other woods.  It glues well, sands easily, and readily accepts finishes.

Back to top>

 

 

Q: Is cypress wood a durable product?
Cypress is oil based wood, impregnated with cypressene, a natural preservative manufactured during the growth of cypress tree that prevents the development of decay causing fungi.  Nature has done for Tidewater Red Cypress what man tries to do when he attempts to force preservatives into wood to prevent decay.  With a suitable surface treatment, cypress wood has a superior durability, holding stain or paint well and resisting weather.

Back to top>

 

 

Q: How dry is your cypress product?
We dry all of our 1” x 2” cypress wood to a moisture content of approximately 19%.  Any timbers and items custom sawn from logs will be a green or wet wood, which we will then air dry.  The moisture content of green logs could be as high as 50%.

Back to top>

 

 

Q: What lengths of cypress material does Coastal Cypress offer?
While our most common lengths are 12' - 14' - 16', our cypress wood material is sold in random lengths from 6' to 16', unless specified otherwise.  Rough sawn 4” x 4” to 12” x 12” timbers, which are custom cut, are available up to 16' long in length.

Back to top>

 

 

Q: What does rough sawn and smooth planed mean for cypress wood?
Rough sawn cypress wood has a rough-saw texture and only approximate or rough dimensions.  Moreover, your cypress wood could have stick marks left during the drying process, could suffer some weathering (grey or charcoal colored), and could have some small metal banding marks where it was bundled together. 

Smooth, planed cypress wood is the wood product that has been run through a wood planer, which gives it a smooth finish.  It's milled to exact dimensions and planed on all four sides, unless specified otherwise.

Back to top>

 

 

Q: Is cypress material a good interior flooring material?
Yes – cypress wood flooring is a good choice, but it is a relatively soft wood and will take on an "aged" look when used in high traffic areas.  To give it a harder finish, you should consider sealing it with a urethane product.

Back to top>

 

 

Q: How should I finish my cypress wood products?
We recommend two coats of a polyurethane varnish for interior walls and ceilings.  Before applying a second coat of varnish, you may need to lightly sand because the first coat of varnish may raise the grain a little bit.  Because cypress wood beautifies just as well with paint, you can also paint your interior cypress wood.   

For exteriors, you can let it weather naturally (turns gray or charcoal color), but it will perform better long term if you seal it with a stain or paint.  If using stains, please use oil based wood stain with a mildew inhibitor.  For your information, most clear stains last 1 - 3 years, semi-transparent colored stains (wood grain still visible) last 3 - 5 years, solid colored stains last 5 - 10 years, and most paints last 10 - 20 years.

Back to top>

 

 

Q: How does cypress wood compare with pine and cedar wood?
Cypress grows slowly, so the rings are much closer (making cypress wood dense) than in most wood species.  These close rings make cypress wood more energy efficient, and the density of cypress wood decreases shrinkage, which makes it more durable and stable.  In its natural state, the cypress wood is a pale, honey color and, if left unprotected without a stain sealant, it will weather to a gray or charcoal color on the surface (natural color can easily be restored if desired). 

Pine trees grow much quicker than cypress trees (mature pine tree takes 30 – 40 years but a mature cypress tree takes 80 – 200 years).  As you might imagine the quicker growing pine tree results in wider growth rings and a less stable, more porous surface.  This means pine wood is more susceptible to shrinkage and normally requires a borate treatment to prevent rot and insect attack.  This porous wood material stains through the face and with treatment, it becomes somewhat darker.  Untreated pine material will stain deep toward the core, leaving permanent marks and becoming subject to mold and rot.  For this reason, natural weathering is not recommended for any pine wood material.  Pine wood material is well known to move (shrink, settle, and warp or cup) unless properly dried.

Cedar wood is a darker wood with a heavy odor (check for allergic sensitivity).  A lightweight and porous wood, it weathers and absorbs treatment products that result in darker tones.  Knots in cedar wood tend to loosen over time and are much more frequent than in cypress wood.

Back to top>

 

 

Q: What is the difference between board feet, square feet, and linear feet?
“Board feet” is a lumber industry term that is a measurement of wood volume.  A board foot is equal to a piece of wood 12” x 12” x 1” thick, or 144 cubic inches.  However, we offer our cypress wood products in linear feet.

“Square feet” is a common home building industry measurement of area.  It is like the floor area of your home, simply width x length, i.e. 40’ wide x 30’ long = 1,200 square feet.

“Linear feet” is a wood measurement of length.  It only measures how long the wood is, not the wood's width or thickness.  So, a piece of wood 1" x 6" x 16’ and a piece of wood 4” x 8” x 16’ are both 16 linear feet of wood.

Back to top>

 
 
Home | About Us | Products | Photo Gallery | Questions | Contact Us